The Stem Cell Facelift – Fact or Fabrication

The Stem Cell Facelift - Fact or Fabrication

Gargoyle of St. Severin in Paris, France - Photo taken by Dr. Paul Howard

If one were to internet search “stem cell facelift” or “non-surgical facelift” you get hundreds of search results describing outrageous claims of facial rejuvenation that exceed the results of “surgical facelifting.”  There will always be people following the holy grail of “non-surgical” procedures of all types.  These same people probably believe in gremlins, gargoyles, and the tooth fairy, all myths that get some play over the internet.  All good myths (and lies) seem credible because they were based initially on facts.  For instance, let’s look at the so-called “liquid lift” touted as some version of the “non-surgical facelift.”  Plastic Surgeons have known and is replete in our literature that one aspect of facial aging is due to a loss of soft tissue (mainly fat) volume, no one who studies the aging process believes that simply addressing facial volume issues will in effect result in “lifting” of facial structures, i.e. the “liquid facelift.”  The proposition will always find an audience with those individuals who, for varied reasons, are frightened of surgery.  The proposition of volume lifting gets momentum as its practitioners recommend using one of today’s off the shelf fillers at $200-300 per milliliter.  It could take 30cc of filler to achieve the fullness necessary to claim the face is lifted.  This is a perfect example of utilizing a true discovery to develop a non-surgical marketing slogan such as the “liquid lift.”  If such a procedure actually worked, we could all take our marbles and go home as the answer to facial rejuvenation would be upon us.  As much as this would benefit the non-surgeon, it happens to be untrue, but still worth a try if you cannot do a proper facelift or obtain autologous fat as a filler rather than having a basically painless and simple surgical facelift.

The Stem Cell Face Lift is another of these stylized marketing slogans based on actual scientific discovery (stem cell biology) adulterated as some sort of magic bullet that “lifts” faces.  I think that the gargoyles protecting Notre Dame in Paris makes more sense than a stem cell “lifting” anything.  This is not to say stem cells don’t exist or that their discovery isn’t useful when applied to the biology fat grafting and actual facial skin rejuvenation.  An understanding of stem cell biology and how to isolate them from adipose tissue will probably become routine for all Plastic Surgeon’s in the near future.  Hopefully, as more and more is published on the subject of stem cells there will be fewer practitioners with a financial incentive to propagate the fantasy which is the “stem cell facelift.”  The final straw may be the fact that many of the non-surgeons are parlaying some knowledge of stem cell biology into a $20,000 procedure!

In the final analysis common sense dictates that stem cells are real and are a really important adjunct to my facial rejuvenation procedures, but by themselves cannot “lift” anything, particularly an aged face.