Count Dracula and the “Vampire Facelift™”

Vampire Stem Cell Face Lift

Count Vlad’s Castle in Romania. Dr. Paul S. Howard visited Romania several years ago to operate on orphaned children born with facial deformities.

Author Anne Rice benefited from the allure of the Vampire in pop culture where there has always been a certain interest in all things Romania.  From Count Vlad “the Impaler,” to the gypsy culture and even gymnast Nadia Comaneci have all fueled interest in the darkest of the former Eastern Bloc Soviet satellite countries.  Our fascination with Romanian people may stem from their unique Eastern European history.  The Romanian is proud of his Dacian ancestry making their culture and language more like that in Rome than their geographic neighbors which are Slavic countries such as Hungary, Serbia, Moldavia, and Bulgaria.

The myth that is Dracula has a basis in fact steeped in the history of Romania and the Dark Ages of Europe.  Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia, member of the House of Draculesti, known by the patronymic name Dracula was born in Transylvania in 1431.  The translation of the name Dracula comes from his father Vlad Dracula, meaning “dragon” or “devil.”  Vlad III was known in his adult life as the son of the devil.  It was only after his death in 1476 that he became known as tepes or “the spike,” alluding to his famous battles with the Islamic Turks and his father’s battles with the Boyer Family for the thrown of Wallachia.  Both the Boyers and the Turks were “spiked” or impaled as punishment and as a deterrent.  Thus, Vlad “The Impaler” was born.  It was left to the Irish author, Bram Stoker, to rekindle the Dracula legend as well as embellish it to include the Vampire myth in his 1899 gothic horror novel, Dracula.

The recent fascination with the Vampire myth was stoked by any number of books including those by Ann Rice and the TV series Vampire Chronicles.  It comes as no surprise that medical marketing would jump into the Vampire craze even though the institution of Vampire tales is beginning to wear thin even in pop culture.  We now have a non-surgeon entering the pop-culture marketplace with the so called “Vampire Facelift.”  The connection with vampires is interesting in that vampires are a Gothic myth with no factual basis much like the vampire Facelift™ is more of a New Age myth with no basis in fact.  The connection to Vampire culture is through the use of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) as an adjunct to the use of temporary foreign fillers (Juvederm™, Restylane™) to effect some sort of facial rejuvenation akin to the well-worn “Liquid Lift™.  Fillers plus PRP equals the Vampire Facelift™.

Platelet Rich Plasma is obtained by drawing blood from the patient’s arm (not the neck as in vampire-lore), and by processing the blood one obtains platelet poor plasma (PPP) and platelet rich plasma.  The most well-known use of PPP is “fibrin glue,” a soft tissue sealant used in many kinds of surgery.  PRP has a bewildering array of uses, but all of the known benefits come from the activation and stimulation of growth factors and cytokines.  These are necessary for cellular activity which benefits blood supply, healing and specifically the “take” of fat grafts mediated through the activation of stem cells.

Recently it has come to light that activated stem cells and PRP have a beneficial effect on aging skin causing increased collagen synthesis, may be helpful to increase elasticity and is believed to improve skin texture as well.

Platelet Rich Plasma, coming from blood, has many important functions, but none of these functions create volume nor “lift” tissues in any way.  Additionally, PRP is very easy to obtain from blood.  The actual skill involved is drawing the blood which is easily processed to PRP, is easy to activate with calcium and thrombin, and actually is a source of protein when swallowed (vampire’s diet).

Utilization of PRP is a useful adjunct for facial rejuvenation, but in and of itself has not shown to have much of a rejuvenating effect.  The addition of temporary fillers does not improve what is already known about the temporary volumizing effect of hyaluronic acid based fillers.  The two together serve to prove the uselessness of trademark laws as applied to medical science.

Dr. Paul Howard is Board Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

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