Lifestyle Lift® FAQS & Fiction by Paul Howard, MD

Facelift Scar Comparison

Facelift Scar Comparison

How is the LSL better than other Facelifts?

The LSL is not a breakthrough procedure nor are any of the LSL techniques new in any way.  THE LSL is first and foremost a marketing company that hires physicians to do a version of the LSL.  In fact, their surgeons are not even required to do the LSL procedure.

How is the LSL different than other procedures?

The LSL is a version of the short-scar facelift procedure that was first described by others.  Included in the procedure is a so called SMAS plication which has been around for 20+ years and is one of many ways to tighten the deeper layers of the face.  The only possible advance the LSL offers is that it is performed under local anesthesia which has been available since the 1920’s.

Is the Lifestyle Lift® Cheaper?

The cost of the LSL procedure is different depending on where in the country one lives.  The fact is that the actual cost of the LSL is roughly equivalent to what most plastic surgeons charge especially when you consider the “fine print” procedures that are required on almost all patients.

Is there a difference in recovery from the LSL?

The rapidity of recovery depends more on the individual surgeon than the exact procedure performed.  Patient selection is probably the most important adjunct in recovery time and LSL patient selection is initially done by “consultationists” without even a medical degree.

Will I Bruise More?

One of the ways a plastic surgeon can decrease bruising is due to the technique chosen and in many cases whether or not the surgeon uses drains expeditiously. Part of the LSL marketing scheme brags about not using drains as if not using drains when indicated is somehow better.

Are the LSL Scars Better?

The short facelift scar pattern is pretty much the same for everyone.  The execution of the scar varies from surgeon to surgeon, but the scars don’t seem to do as well nor are they properly positioned in many of the LSL procedures (my personal experience). It is also easier to obtain good scarring with frequent follow-up and in-depth patient instruction which is not typical in practices that are volume driven like the LSL.

What is the Most Important Decision when Choosing a Facelift?

Most people believe that the most important aspect of achieving good results in facelift surgery is the choice of SURGEON and not the procedure or any number of other considerations.  It is interesting that the one thing that the LSL marketing scheme minimizes is the surgeon; such that the surgeon is the last person one meets in the process.  The consultationists and the people who collect the money seem much more important and meet the prospective patient well before the surgeon is chosen for you.

Read more about top facelift surgeon Dr. Paul Howard Birmingham, Alabama.

Call today to schedule your Facelift Consultation with Dr. Paul Howard

205-877-PAUL

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Lifestyle Lift – The Small Print by Paul Howard, MD

It’s clear that the Liftstyle Lift ® (LSL) brand is a marketing juggernaut.  Cable, non-cable, internet, Debbie Boone is everywhere “lighting up my life.”  Their TV testimonials are uplifting by simply showing regular people with that blank stare pre-operatively and that smiling, happy visage after their LSL.  It is easy to see why there are so many lawsuits accusing this marketing company of being false and deceptive in their TV ads.  One of the oldest plastic surgery tricks to improve facial surgery results is to take the post-op photos of the patient smiling; smiling is the first and best natural rejuvenator lifting the sagging face without a single stitch.  Giving in to the “marketing police,” the LSL folks do add a few sentences in fine print at the bottom of the TV ad admitting that each patient had a litany of other procedures in addition to their LSL.  It is the other procedures in the small print that actually determine the quality of the result and are the subject of this article.

Over the time that I’ve been in practice, two things have actually vastly improved my facelifting results.  Recently, it has been the use of local anesthesia with sedation rather than general anesthesia.  The second improvement has been improvements in the neck contouring and the blending of the lower eyelid with the cheek as an adjunct to our version of the mid-face lift.  In the LSL marketing parlance these are called “neck firming” and “eyelid firming” procedures that really make a difference in the quality of the result, especially when the patient is not smiling.

Eyelid blending has always been a problem except in the extreme cases of facelift procedures done at deeper levels that allow for more tension on the SMAS and facial muscles with their fascia.  These operations are not an option for many people who cannot take 3-6 weeks out of their busy schedules to be swollen.

One of the integral causes of the dark circles and lower lid “crescent,” in addition to the weakening of the tissues that are meant to contain the lower lid fat allowing the fat pockets to bulge outward, is the dropping of the thin lower eyelid skin down onto the cheek accentuating the junction between the thin lid skin and the thicker cheek skin.  Lifting the midface necessarily raises the lid-cheek junction upward creating excess lid skin.  This is addressed surgically by making a lower lid incision through the muscle so that the lid-cheek junction at the orbital bone can be addressed directly.  Blending of the lid and cheek is done at the same time that the bulging fat is partially removed or simply cauterized.  The remaining tissue (septum) is cauterized to thicken it so that it can then be bolstered by dissolvable sutures.  The extra lid skin created is conservatively excised and a temporary muscle tightening stitch is placed to keep the lower lid from pulling down during the early phase of wound healing.

This description of surgical lid-cheek blending may seem highly technical to some.  For those less interested in details, the net result of the operation is depicted in the photos (note that the patient is not smiling, although she wishes she could!)

Eyelid Surgery Before & After by Dr. Paul S. Howard

Eyelid Surgery Before & After by Dr. Paul S. Howard

The basis of a good result in the lower eyelids as well as the neck is the performance of a proper mid-face lift with an aggressive approach to the jawline and jowls.  The LSL, when done well, can provide this platform to address the neck, lower eyelids as well as the cheek as a unit.  It is very rare to see a patient who has never had surgery that requires only a mid-face lift making these so called “firming” procedures an integral part of facial rejuvenation yet they only get a small print footnote in the marketing juggernaut that is the Lifestyle Lift®.

Dr. Paul S. Howard

Top Facelift Surgeon Birmingham Alabama

Advances in Facial Rejuvenation – How They Occur by Paul S. Howard, MD, FACS

Facelift Alabama

Plastic Surgeon Birmingham Alabama

“Doc, how can you make me look better, fresher, and maybe even a little younger looking?”

The answer to this question depends on many variables, but actually is easy for each individual surgeon to answer.  In fact, all surgical advances begin with a patient asking a doctor his opinion on a problem that is bothersome to the patient.  In the early 1900’s, the question may have been, “Doc, can you get rid of this unsightly hump on my nose?”  Maybe it was a teenager who wondered if her protruding “Dumbo ears” could be set back.  In the 60’s it might have been, “Doc, what can you do for these fat deposits on my thighs?”  Each of these questions was first met with skepticism by the surgeon followed by a moment of reflection and ending with the promise to get back to the patient after having a chance to think about it.  These accumulated “moments of reflection” are the substance of hundreds of manuscripts and then textbooks describing all of the innovations that have become the essence of plastic surgery as we know it today.

Recently, the question that continues to arise refers to looking more youthful, but is tainted by the attempt of many surgeons and non-surgeons to answer this question with a multitude of poorly conceived procedures, potions, lotions, and quick fixes that frequently fail to provide the answer to the question.  Photos that are presented fail to show youthfulness and frequently are not honest and believable.

The part of this anti-aging scenario that surgeons have come closer to accomplishing is the anti-gravity part where the desire for a procedure that lifts drooping facial tissue, especially the cheeks, forehead and neck, is accomplished with minimal incisions, safe anesthetic techniques and a rapid recovery time to the resumption of normal activities.  These accomplishments in facelift surgery are actually recent because advancements only happen when our patients ask for them.  There came a time when massive swelling and bruising, general anesthetic and a month recovery was not good enough and patients asked for more (or less).  It became clear that simply tightening skin to elevate facial fat and remove wrinkles was a simplistic approach to facial rejuvenation.  Although lifting and tightening worked to a certain degree, it did little or nothing to address that facial deflation by the loss of fat is an integral component of the aging process.  The use of fat transplantation, as is has now been perfected, has provided a therapeutic answer to deflation while fulfilling basic plastic surgical principles as described by Ralph Millard, MD.  In a nutshell, fat transfer is the result of identifying a problem, replacing what is lost with tissue in-kind, all the while improving the donor site via liposuction – Dr. Millard would love it!

This is the magical point in the scenario where luck comes into play as it applies to the “law of unintended consequences.”  The smartest of our brethren saw it almost immediately, but the rest of us took a while to see that which was right in front of us.  Our fat grafts carried with them a myriad of growth factors, cytokines, and unknown chemicals that helped the grafts “take,” but also exerted their influence on the overlying skin; the last aspect of the aging face addressed surgically.  By the simplest of methods – observation – it was noticed that the skin was visibly improved by the fat grafts; it had more collagen, more elasticity, improved texture, and an improvement in the fine lines and wrinkles.  As our knowledge evolved it became clear that these secondary consequences were the result of the stem cells that we now know to exist within the fat grafts.  The next small step was to isolate the adipose-derived stem cells from the fat and reintroduce the stem cells to improve the “take” of the fat and add improvement to the skin.  The addition of other known growth factors found in platelets as a PRP boosted the rejuvenation ability of fat grafts even more.  I think it has also become quite clear that depositing these rejuvenating aspects with an appropriate scaffold (fat) beneath the skin improves the results drastically from the awkward attempts to simply rub these against on the skin’s surface.  It follows that the best we can do from the surface is to accelerate the turnover of the skin cells and remove as many of the dead cells as possible; hoping to unveil the dermal and sub-dermal improvements obtained from our stem cell assisted lipo-transfer protocol.

What I have described is the way plastic surgical advances happen.  Doctors and patients have been dancing this question and answer Waltz for over a hundred years so it should be of no surprise that many of the questions were asked a hundred years ago, but the answers have only recently shown themselves to those who continue to look for them.

Call today for your consultation! 205-877-PAUL

Read more about Dr. Paul Howard and his minimal incision face lift.

Count Dracula and the “Vampire Facelift™”

Vampire Stem Cell Face Lift

Count Vlad’s Castle in Romania. Dr. Paul S. Howard visited Romania several years ago to operate on orphaned children born with facial deformities.

Author Anne Rice benefited from the allure of the Vampire in pop culture where there has always been a certain interest in all things Romania.  From Count Vlad “the Impaler,” to the gypsy culture and even gymnast Nadia Comaneci have all fueled interest in the darkest of the former Eastern Bloc Soviet satellite countries.  Our fascination with Romanian people may stem from their unique Eastern European history.  The Romanian is proud of his Dacian ancestry making their culture and language more like that in Rome than their geographic neighbors which are Slavic countries such as Hungary, Serbia, Moldavia, and Bulgaria.

The myth that is Dracula has a basis in fact steeped in the history of Romania and the Dark Ages of Europe.  Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia, member of the House of Draculesti, known by the patronymic name Dracula was born in Transylvania in 1431.  The translation of the name Dracula comes from his father Vlad Dracula, meaning “dragon” or “devil.”  Vlad III was known in his adult life as the son of the devil.  It was only after his death in 1476 that he became known as tepes or “the spike,” alluding to his famous battles with the Islamic Turks and his father’s battles with the Boyer Family for the thrown of Wallachia.  Both the Boyers and the Turks were “spiked” or impaled as punishment and as a deterrent.  Thus, Vlad “The Impaler” was born.  It was left to the Irish author, Bram Stoker, to rekindle the Dracula legend as well as embellish it to include the Vampire myth in his 1899 gothic horror novel, Dracula.

The recent fascination with the Vampire myth was stoked by any number of books including those by Ann Rice and the TV series Vampire Chronicles.  It comes as no surprise that medical marketing would jump into the Vampire craze even though the institution of Vampire tales is beginning to wear thin even in pop culture.  We now have a non-surgeon entering the pop-culture marketplace with the so called “Vampire Facelift.”  The connection with vampires is interesting in that vampires are a Gothic myth with no factual basis much like the vampire Facelift™ is more of a New Age myth with no basis in fact.  The connection to Vampire culture is through the use of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) as an adjunct to the use of temporary foreign fillers (Juvederm™, Restylane™) to effect some sort of facial rejuvenation akin to the well-worn “Liquid Lift™.  Fillers plus PRP equals the Vampire Facelift™.

Platelet Rich Plasma is obtained by drawing blood from the patient’s arm (not the neck as in vampire-lore), and by processing the blood one obtains platelet poor plasma (PPP) and platelet rich plasma.  The most well-known use of PPP is “fibrin glue,” a soft tissue sealant used in many kinds of surgery.  PRP has a bewildering array of uses, but all of the known benefits come from the activation and stimulation of growth factors and cytokines.  These are necessary for cellular activity which benefits blood supply, healing and specifically the “take” of fat grafts mediated through the activation of stem cells.

Recently it has come to light that activated stem cells and PRP have a beneficial effect on aging skin causing increased collagen synthesis, may be helpful to increase elasticity and is believed to improve skin texture as well.

Platelet rich plasma, coming from blood, has many important functions, but none of these functions create volume nor “lift” tissues in any way.  Additionally, PRP is very easy to obtain from blood.  The actual skill involved is drawing the blood which is easily processed to PRP, is easy to activate with calcium and thrombin, and actually is a source of protein when swallowed (vampire’s diet).

Utilization of PRP is a useful adjunct for facial rejuvenation, but in and of itself has not shown to have much of a rejuvenating effect.  The addition of temporary fillers does not improve what is already known about the temporary volumizing effect of hyaluronic acid based fillers.  The two together serve to prove the uselessness of trademark laws as applied to medical science.

Dr. Paul Howard is Board Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

What the Hell is a Consultationist?

I, and many other who enjoy the English language, have been wondering which new words would be added to the lexicon of America.  These new words, or neologisms, are usually chosen by a group of exudate linguists to be included according to the extent of pervasiveness of their usage.  This begs an answer to today’s question: what the hell is a consultationist?

Upon checking Webster’s and Harper Collins dictionaries, no reference is made for the noun consultationist.  The closest reference is for consultation which we all know means an appointment or meeting to seek professional advice especially from doctors or lawyers.  It is through this prism that the term consultationist has come into my practice universe and the lexicon of plastic surgery.  Apparently in certain plastic surgery mass-marketing schemes, the number of patients seeking information is much greater than the doctors available to provide information thus leading to a new paradigm for plastic surgery practice by placing the here-to-fore unknown consultationist into the complex surgical information loop.  Naturally, not every plastic surgeon answers every contact for surgical information, but we all provide detailed information to our office staff who field those questions from the public.  The flow of accurate information through surgical surrogates called consultationists to the patient seems fraught with uncertainty proportional to the number of individual surgeons responsible for the information provided by surrogates.  The information provided, by necessity, must be wholly generic in nature as no one but the plastic surgeon can provide the necessary depth of knowledge and experience to provide anything approaching a real consultation.  These new plastic surgery mass-marketing schemes, in addition to spending millions of dollars on TV, radio, print, and internet, have actually added a layer of advertising bureaucracy as the information requests are funneled through a new layer of marketing specialists called consultationists.  These new patient calls have become “sales leads” rather than actual consultations.

This new marketing centered paradigm created a number of questions all of which surround the activities of the newly minted consultationist.  For instance, who are these people, how are they reimbursed, what is their background and training, and who decides what they say and who do they report to: the physicians, marketing director, or corporate management, or all of the above?  Is the protection and dissimulation of the brand primary or does accurate surgical information take precedence?  Regardless of the answers to these questions, the marketing consultationist has added an entirely new level of bureaucracy that can only be financially justified if information requests turn into actual doctor consultations.

Clearly it serves no purpose for any prospective patient to be denied a real consultation so the information flow through consultationists carries no more weight than any well-crafted patient directed web site.  The web site will certainly answer the single most important question at any consultation: who is your doctor?

It seems this one single question which would seemingly be the easiest to answer during any real consultation is usually the hardest question for a consultationist to answer generally depending on how many doctors are the recipients of this marketing service or sales lead.

I’m not sure I have been able to actually answer my initial question: What the hell is a consultationist?  My best research tells me a consultationist is but a cog in the marketing paradigm for certain large companies that endeavor to sell some kind of trademarked surgical procedure in some generic fashion.   The challenge is to maximize the marketing of the procedure, even if the procedure is not proprietary or in any way original.

The focus of the expert marketing must maximize the procedure and minimize the surgeon because each surgeon is an individual, but the procedure is universal and much more available as a marketing center piece.  This type of marketing plan when well executed can be enormously effective unless the “generic” surgeon pool is depleted or becomes technically antiquated and changes do not keep apace the market for facial rejuvenation.  Many of the predictable corporate problems are a result of the realities of size and success.  Time will be the arbiter regarding consultationists.  In the meantime, most of us will try to muddle on without them.

Read more about top face lift surgeon Dr. Paul Howard and his minimal incision, quick recovery facelift.

Anesthesia for Facial Plastic Surgery

Facelift Alabama

Schedule your facelift consultation with Dr. Howard by calling 205-871-3361

There is a movement afoot to try to legislate safety in plastic surgery by controlling what we do rather than taking the more difficult route of controlling the credentials and training of practitioners.  State governments must find it less offensive to certain constituencies to legislate what we do and how we do it rather than more directly addressing the office surgical setting by requiring each and every practitioner to have a minimal amount of core training in the procedures legislators deem unsafe.  When non-professionals try to address concerns on medical safety it always appears that some group of doctors may be affected and their arguments always seem to be based on possible financial restraints or financial hardships that fully trained and credentialed doctors may not suffer.  The implications are that all doctors, regardless of training, are essentially equal.  No such assumptions are proffered for neurosurgeons or cardiac surgeons.  There is no legislation attempting to equalize specialty surgeons by defining what we do to make the entire group safer.  No one has proposed the idea that cardiologists, with little or no surgeon training, should be allowed to do open heart surgery as long as they operate in a safe manner and do the operations in approved facilities.  It would seem safer to address the training and credentials of those performing open heart surgery rather than restricting cardiologists to “simple” open heart cases.  This is much like restricting non-plastic surgeons to “simple” or low volume liposuction searching for a safety standard by “dumbing down” the operation and its possible complications.

In another way, many surgeons and non-surgeon administrators have convinced people that surgery is always safer when performed under general anesthesia with an anesthesiologist in attendance.  The fact is that almost all facial plastic surgical procedures done on adults for cosmetic reasons are safer when performed without general anesthesia, and its riskier counterparts, mask anesthesia and monitored anesthetic care.  The latter two are basically general anesthesia without the benefit of a secure airway and in facial cases, a difficulty in administering oxygen as needed.  It’s easy to declare that all patients need the most sophisticated and complex care in all circumstances with the assumption being that this is the safest way to proceed.  One aspect of plastic surgical complications that seems to be consistently overlooked is the general anesthetic contribution to all complications.  The fact that general anesthesia is related to complications is found in the surgical maxim that complication rates increase rather drastically after 2 hours under general anesthesia.  I don’t believe that operations longer than 2 hours are inherently more dangerous.  Many surgeons think that their meticulous technique, while sometimes slow, gives better results even though they may require hours longer under general anesthesia.  As a general rule, those surgeons who expedite the operation to decrease operative time are the safest.  The only way to further increase safety is to take the general anesthetic out of the picture.  Interestingly, using local anesthetics and regional blocks requires an entirely new skill set and, most importantly, it requires patience.  Adding sedation in the form of oral medication helps to make the experience more comfortable, but adds very little to the complication profile as these are the very same medications we use in our post-operative outpatient patients.  We have found that the intravenous use of medications such as versed and morphine creates large increases of medications with a short half-life and is more likely to cause nausea and vomiting.  Nausea is a much less common problem with oral medication especially if Phenergan or Zofran are used with the pre-operative oral medications.

In the past, the major complaint with local anesthesia with or without oral sedation is that it can burn when injected.  There are a number of techniques that surgeons can utilize to make the injections much less painful.  Almost all of these techniques require only a bit of patience from the surgeon.  The most commonly used anesthetics are Xylocaine and Marcaine.  Due to the acidic pH of Xylocaine, most surgeons have for years added bicarbonate to decrease the “burn” when injected.  The problem with adding bicarbonate is that it decreases the ability of the Xylocaine to work as well and may require a larger volume of injection.  Knowing the details of Xylocaine led to a search for better anesthetics.  Our search led us to Paris, France where we discovered Septocaine.  We found that Septocaine has about the same complications and dosage profile as Xylocaine.  The difference with Septocaine is that it is less painful to inject, it tends to work faster, and provides what patients describe as a more “intense” numbness.  We have used Septocaine as a primary local anesthetic for over 10 years and I am sure it is more comfortable for the patients. The downside is that it is more expensive to use.  This is a small price to pay for patient comfort.  It is important to understand that the reason for all of this discussion is to make sure our facial plastic surgery patients are comfortable, pain-free, and safe while having surgery.

From a medical/surgical point of view there is a very specific and important reason to use local anesthetics and oral sedation rather than general anesthetics.  We are convinced that the vast majority of post-operative facial swelling after facelift surgery is caused by transient but significant changes in blood pressure during and immediately after surgery.  In fact, I believe most hematomas and swelling occur in the period of time after the procedure is finished during the period of time when the patient emerges from general anesthesia.  We believe that controlling the blood pressure at pre-operative levels throughout the operation and especially at the end has decreased swelling post-operatively dramatically.  Blood pressure control and the judicious use of epinephrine in our local anesthesia with complete patient monitoring has completely changed the first 24 hours after surgery – much less bruising, swelling, hematomas.

One might ask why everyone who does facelifts wouldn’t do it with these techniques.  The primary reason is probably the patience it requires and the fact each facelift should be done by itself each day.  This fact resulted in our “One Facelift a Day” promise.

Read more about top facelift surgeon Dr. Paul Howard and his no general anesthesia facelift.

Looking Younger is Not a Sin

Having spent the majority of my life in big cities such as Atlanta, Miami and Paris, I was taken aback by the responses of women in smaller southern cities such as Birmingham, Montgomery or Mobile to the notion of facelift procedures.  I have on occasion related an anecdote about women in the South; if one asks a woman on the street in Miami or Paris “who is your doctor?,” the usual reply will get you the name of her plastic surgeon. The same question posed to a woman in Birmingham will get you the name of her gynecologist.  I have no particular problem with gynecologists but it does reflect a palpable difference regarding priorities in medical care. Likewise, there always exists a group of women who proudly notify their friends and family of their impending surgery and show their friends the results the moment the dressings are off.  A more common scenario in the South is that most women are very private in their personal affairs and only confide in their families and closest friends.  We are not talking about people of wealth as no one knows how or why celebrities and the wealthy choose their healthcare providers.  Judging from what we see on cable TV, the Michael Jacksons’ of the world as well as many aging models and TV stars should reconsider their choices of doctors, especially those who are fighting the aging process in an attempt to remain on the ‘’A’’ list.

The best example is the Hollywood penchant to completely overdo lip augmentation. The reason this is an issue is because “normal” people who inquire about lip enhancement look at celebrities, think they probably get the best plastic surgery, and assume that the comical, overdone lips are necessary for lip enhancement. Two bad assumptions are at work here: the first is that celebrities get the best plastic surgeons and the second is that enhanced lips should be huge and comical in appearance.  Good plastic surgeons can usually enhance lips in any of a number of ways achieving fullness, a very youthful pout and accentuation of youthful lip anatomy without the “bee-stung” comical lips that we see all too often. The choice to overdo any plastic surgical procedure is entirely up to the patient and not a part of plastic surgery itself.  There is an unknown in this process, which is the individual talent and taste of the plastic surgeon involved.  This is why it helps to see examples of the surgeons work in order to get some idea of how aggressive or exaggerated the work is. Surgeons will usually show pictures of work they consider exemplary so when viewing catalogs of photos it is good to evaluate each result carefully taking in to consideration your specific taste, even if the photos are of procedures you are not considering.

One of the most challenging operations for a plastic surgeon is rhinoplasty. This is why there are so many “challenged” noses out there in Hollywood.  It is a bit of a cliché to use the Jackson family as an example of rhinoplasty gone wrong but I’ll do it anyway.  I believe that at least one of the early iterations of Michael’s nose was an attractive change from his original ethnic nose into a slightly improved version.  I would surmise that it was an operation or two later that his final scar laden, next to nothing nose emerged was left of his original proboscis. Without the wonders of his handy, at home, hyperbaric oxygen chamber Michael may certainly have lost his nose in its entirety.  I suspect that the last twenty or so operations were not procedures chosen by his surgeon yet performed nonetheles.  The legacy of the Jackson family nasal nightmare should probably not be left with the surgeon but with the patients who are too famous, have too much money and succumbed to too much bad advice or a lack of good judgment.

Breasts have long been the subject of Hollywood photographers and celebrity magazines.  Ever since Janet Jackson’s infamous Super bowl wardrobe malfunction there seems a preoccupation with breasts, especially large ones. Many women seem to have attached their femininity to their cup size. The trend to larger breasts is exemplified by today’s Victoria Secret models that are not as anorectic as the models of the 80’s and 90’s.  In the real world outside of Hollywood women who consult for breast augmentation also want larger, fuller breasts but they also want “plausible deniability.”  That requires breasts large enough to be sexy but not quite so large that they could not conceivably be nature’s gift.

Plastic surgery and the “beauty business” as it is now called did not arise from the devil as a temptation to vanity but rather as a consequence of the very normal desire of human beings to appear physically attractive to each other. The process of aging tends to extinguish some of the physical attractiveness of youth.  Aging gracefully is the excuse given not to intervene with plastic surgery but our “grace” does not preclude spending billions of dollars on products for our hair, skin and nails.   Recently, plastic surgeons have become facile and more creative with the surgical interventions we recommend to treat the aging face.  Our operations tend to be less one-size-fits-all and are uniformly less invasive.  Surgeons now are utilizing more of our scientific educational background to apply the latest in biology to scientifically improve our results and to stay abreast the latest research and findings.

Those of us in facial and body enhancement business are as different as our patients. The best we can do individually is to provide up to date, non-biased information including our training and certifications to the table and provide honest, accurate photographs of our work so that patients may get an idea of our preferences and our aesthetic sensibilities.  The more factual information out there, the better chance the patient can find the right surgeon for the right problem.